Hotel, Restaurant Management Games

Hotel Management Games & Restaurant Management Games Pt. 2

In the first part of this three part series, we spoke about how games were a great way to teach your staff. Check the article out here. In this article we will go into hotel and restaurant management games that focus on communication. In the hospitality industry you will inherently have to do a large amount of communication. This will be the case whether with your staff or your guests. Building your chops when it comes to small talk, negotiations, or conflict resolutions will prove to be highly beneficial. There was a survey done in 2009 by Watson Wyatt that discovered how internal communication “can keep employees engaged in business and help companies retain key talent, provide consistent value to customers, and deliver superior financial performance to shareholders.” There is a clear return on investment in building not only a better pipeline amongst staff but also with guests. Try these hotel management games/restaurant management games out to better your communication skills.

Communication Games

LEGOMAN

Hotel Management Games & Restaurant Management Games Pt. 2

This communication game works on memory and communication. Separate the team into groups of 3-6 people. You will need building blocks, they could be small or large and a shield of some sort, this could be a cardboard box if you like. The same amount of type of building blocks should be given to each team and to you. Build a sculpture out of the blocks and have one representative from each group view the sculpture, shielding it from everyone else. Assign a set time limit and have the representative return to their team to describe the sculpture to them. At the end of the time limit you see which teams built the most accurate sculpture.  Have the teams send another representative if no team builds an accurate replica. This game can go on until everyone has had a chance to be a representative.

THE MINE FIELD

This is a fun hotel management game that focuses on giving directions but also builds trust. You need an open space. An empty room can be used or a hallway. The point of the space is to have a start and end point. You simply put a set of random objects around in the space. These will be the “mines”. Divide your team into teams of two. One teammate will be blindfolded and the other will be giving directions on how to get from the one end to the other. If you want to increase the difficulty have more than one team go through the minefield at the same time. This way the blindfolded teammate will have to listen more intently.

LAST LETTER

This communication game can be played any time. It is quick and fun. It is an improv game that helps you be quick and thoughtful. You simply have to hold a conversation where the replies start with the last letter the other person spoke. For example

“Hi, how are you?”

“Understanding me is very thoughtful of you. I am going geat.”

“That is awesome to hear, I am doing great as well.”

“Last time you weren’t doing so great, I am glad you’ve gotten better”

The conversations can get quite interesting and be witty. This game will boost your creativity in conversation and allow you to hone your listening skills. The better listerner you are, the better you will do in this communication game. This is one of the first restaurant management games I played.

YES AND

Hotel Management Games & Restaurant Management Games Pt. 2

This communication game brings forth listening skills but also conflict resolution and acceptance. In this game you will build on the comments and scenes built by the originator. The original thought is said such as, “Today is going to be extremely hot

“Today is going to be extremely hot.”

“Yes, and it will be humid.”

“Yes, and we’re lucky we have a pool.”

“Yes, and that it there are cabanas”

This game can end at any time by a denial. “No, the cabanas are booked already.” You can do variations of this game like “Yes, but” or “You know what”. The basis of this game is to have your staff learn to listen and build upon rather than steer conversations off topic.

Use these games and let us know what your team thought. We’d love to hear from you in the comments section below. Did your team have fun? Are they communicating better with each other? How about with guests? Do you want to hear about more restaurant management games or hotel management games? Let us know how these communication games worked out for them.

 

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Hospitality professional with in-depth knowledge of front and back office operations, consulting top-level executives with innovative strategies, industry best practices, and providing a custom framework for increasing profitability. Pre-opening team member of properties in the United States and Macau, all ranging from small boutique to mega casino resorts.

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